This timeline can be used as an alternative index to posts on the site: new items will be added when new articles are added.

  • 1315. The freeholders of “Brynbawe” are recorded in the first Extent of Bromfield and Yale.
  • mid 14th century. Brymbo’s boundaries are changed with the incorporation of common and waste from Bersham township, following the creation of Minera.
  • 1411. Charter of Holt grants rights to dig for coal in the “wastes” (vastis) of Coedpoeth and Brymbo, possibly near Pentresaeson
  • 1484. A document records a grant in fee simple by “Edward ap Bady ap Atha” (Adda) to his brother, Ieuan ap Bady ap Atha, of land in Brymbo called “Dole y Blayth” (“the wolf’s meadow”), “in breadth from the land late of Jankyn ap Ieuan ap Atha to the river Gwenfro”
  • c.1500. The largest estate in Brymbo, and the capital messuage of Brymbo Hall, is held by Edward ap Morgan ap Dafydd, a descendant of an important family who have already owned the land for several generations. It is later inherited by his son, Gruffydd ap Edward.
  • 1502. Farm of “sea coal” at Brymbo let to John Puleston at 3s. 4d.
  • 1554. A land grant mentions the highway leading from “Stansti ucha to the place [called] Harwd”
  • 1570. A surviving early will details the property of John ap Gruffyth ap Jenkyn of “Gwern y Garn”, Brymbo (a Gwern y Garn is recorded in 1620, owned by “Johannes Gwynn”)
  • 1567. Gruffydd ap Edward of Brymbo leases mills at Minera. His son Robert, who inherits the Brymbo Hall estate, later adopts the surname Griffith.
  • 1574. Court case brought by William Lloyd of Halghton against Howel ap Llewelyn ap David ap Owen regarding copyhold land in Brymbo, probably the estate called the Gyfynys.
  • 1586. The land held in Brymbo by Edward Jones of Plas Cadwgan, Esclusham, is forfeit after his execution for treason. Jones had been implicated in the Babington Plot against Elizabeth I.
  • c.1602. Death of Howel ap Llewelyn ap David ap Owen. His illegitimate son Thomas inherits the Gyfynys and takes the name Thomas Powell, while his daughter Morfydd marries John Sutton of Gwersyllt Issa.
  • 1620. The area is surveyed by John Norden: a coal mine is recorded in “the common called Harwood”, owned by Sir Richard Grosvenor. Much of the land in the township is divided into small freehold estates (“stentiau“) owned by old Welsh families. The main landowners are the Griffith family of Brymbo Hall, William Robinson of Gwersyllt Ucha, and Thomas Powell of the Gyfynys, who also owns a mill. A chapel is noted in the adjacent township of Minera on the land of Hugh ap Robert at Howell; several of the larger estates of Brymbo are later recorded as having pews in this chapel.
  • 1624. John Griffith completes the new Brymbo Hall, later said to have been designed by Inigo Jones.
  • c.1640 William Mostyn, Archdeacon of Bangor, buys a messuage and land in Pentre’r-fron from the Sontley family and from William Mathew. This becomes the core of the Plas Mostyn estate.
  • 1650. John Griffith signs a financial agreement with Sir Richard Saltonstall; he quickly defaults, and Saltonstall takes part of the estate revenues from 1656.
  • c. 1650. During the Commonwealth an estate in Brymbo is held by Captain Hugh Prichard, one of the members of the County Committee for Denbighshire.
  • 1658. John Griffith dies. His son, John Griffith the younger, claims he is compelled to live in “a very poore and low condition” due to Saltonstall’s actions.
  • 1662. Maurice Jones of Glascoed, Brymbo, sets up a charity to benefit the poor of Wrexham parish – a rentcharge on a property called Cae Helig.
  • 1665. Samuel Powell leaves his estate, the Gyfynys, to his son Thomas.
  • c. 1666. The Hearth Tax assessments provide a glimpse of Brymbo’s householders in the period.
  • 1669. Legal action by John Griffith the younger against the heirs of Sir Richard Saltonstall.
  • c.1670. The Plas Mostyn estate inherited by William Mostyn’s eldest son, Roger.
  • 1678. John Griffith the younger is buried at Wrexham on December 4th. His son Robert inherits the Brymbo Hall estate.
  • 1680. Roger Mostyn signs an agreement allowing him to dig for coal on Coedpoeth common.
  • 1684. Robert Griffith signs an agreement with four colliers for extraction of coal, probably at Mount Pleasant. He serves as High Sheriff of Denbighshire in the same year (his neighbour, Roger Mostyn, serves in 1689).
  • 1692. Coal works and coke production are recorded at Lodge, under the management of John Hill. A coal mine owned by the Powell family of Broughton is recorded nearby in the same period.
  • 1699. The largest property in the Glascoed is farmed by the Matthews family, who continue farming in the area until the 19th century.
  • 1705. Robert Griffith’s only son and heir, John, dies without issue. The estate now stands to be inherited by his daughter Mary.
  • 1714. Robert Griffith’s daughter Mary marries Robert Jeffries of Acton, but he dies the following year. In 1716 she marries Richard Clayton, a Shropshire landowner (and Jacobite sympathiser).
  • 1720. Robert Griffith (last of the family’s male line) dies.
  • 1725. Richard Clayton dies; in 1727 his widow, Mary, marries Arthur Owen (her third husband). Horses belonging “to ye coal pitts” at Brymbo are mentioned among her property.
  • 1737. Arthur Owen obtains leases on parcels of land at Nant-y-Ffrith, intending to prospect for lead ore.
  • 1739. The Brymbo estate is left unadministered following the deaths of Mary and Arthur Owen. Dr James Apperley, of Wrexham, marries Richard and Mary’s daughter Alethea Clayton: Brymbo Hall is rated to him until c. 1770, and he continues the existing coal works on the estate. After his death the property is occupied by another of Mary’s daughters, Jane Wynne.
  • 1750. Moses Lewis of the Vron Farm is one of the founders of the first Methodist chapel in North Wales, at Adwy’r Clawdd.
  • 1760. Fynnon-y-cwrw first recorded, when Robert Peter owned it.
  • 1770. A lease is applied for to raise coal on the land of the College Farm, near present-day Vron.
  • c.1770. William Price and John Phillips are partners in “coal works” in Brymbo. At least some of these may have been on the estate called Lodge, where they were granted a lease in 1769 by the owner, Mrs Hill.
  • 1787. Roger Kenyon, of Cefn Park, purchases the Plas Mostyn estate from the Mostyn family.
  • c.1790. The first pit is sunk at the Smelt, according to some sources.
  • ? 1790. John Wilkinson, the ironfounder of Bersham, purchases the Brymbo estate from Jane Wynne and Thomas Assheton-Smith.
  • c. 1792-4. Wilkinson builds a lead smelting works near Caello, and a pumping engine at Penrhos to drain the estate’s mines.
  • 1795-6. Wilkinson builds the “no. 1” blast furnace at Brymbo: it produces over 800 tons of iron in its first year.
  • 1796. An Act regarding the Ellesmere Canal provides for a branch to Ffrwd, to access the area’s collieries and the ironworks. Work is abandoned after two years and two miles.
  • c. 1800. Wilkinson adds other farms to the original Griffith lands, and encloses the Waen and Gorse farms from the old common.
  • 1801. William Wilkinson sinks the Plas Mostyn Colliery at Pentre’r-fron in partnership with Robert Burton of Minera.
  • 1805. John Wilkinson adds a second furnace at Brymbo, aiming for a total production of 4,000 tons a year.
  • c.1806. The Vron Colliery was first sunk around this time, according to G. Lerry.
  • 1808. John Wilkinson dies on July 14th: his estate is placed in the hands of several trustees, principally James Adam. Mismanagement and the effects of a lawsuit by Wilkinson’s nephew (Thomas Jones Wilkinson) and one of the trustees (Samuel Fereday) lead to a decline, and by the 1820s the Brymbo ironworks are idle.
  • 1813. John Thompson starts an ironworks at Ponciau (“Ponkey”). During the 1820s he shows an interest in starting production at Brymbo, but by 1824 has commenced iron-founding at Ffrwd.
  • 1820. A Calvinistic Methodist chapel is built at Harwood.
  • 1825. James Kyrke, a son of the coalmaster Richard Kirk, purchases the large house at Glascoed (later known as Glascoed Hall). He is appointed the receiver of the Wilkinson estate.
  • 1829. Most of the extra land acquired by John Wilkinson is sold to Kyrke and other local landowners, leaving only the original 500 acre estate. Wilkinson’s son, John Wilkinson Jr., uses the proceeds to attempt to restart the ironworks.
  • 1830 Wilkinson’s workmen uncover a large number of ancient horse shoes beneath Offa’s Dyke.
  • 1835. The “Wonder” pit is sunk near Brymbo Hall.
  • 1837. John Wilkinson Jr. emigrates to the US. The ironworks is briefly run by Alexander Reid, whose niece writes about the estate, but it is later bought out of Chancery by Robert Roy.
  • 1838. Brymbo’s first church is consecrated.
  • 1842. Henry Robertson prepares a report on the viability of the ironworks and collieries for Roy and his associates; they appoint him managing partner.
  • 1843. The Bye pit of the Brymbo Colliery (also known as the “Blast” or “Furnace” pit) was sunk under the supervision of Samuel Jones, mine agent.
  • 1844. Brymbo township is made a parish in its own right. In this period the old hamlet of Harwd, or Harwood, begins to expand into the modern village of Brymbo.
  • 1847. John Burton of Minera buys Plas Mostyn out of Chancery.
  • 1847. The railways reach Brymbo, with the opening of an extension of the North Wales Mineral Railway, running from Gwersyllt to Minera via the Moss Valley.
  • 1849. Main coal pit sunk at the Smelt.
  • c. 1850. William Low takes over the colliery at Vron, previously managed by George Moulson.
  • 1857. The Vron Offa Wesleyan chapel is built at Vron.
  • c.1860. Cae Penty colliery is recorded in operation.
  • 1868. The Brymbo vestry debate making a new road to the village, but fail to make any progress.
  • 1884. Under the management of J H Darby, steelmaking is first trialled at Brymbo.
  • 1885. The first elections following the creation of the East Denbighshire constituency result in a riot in Brymbo.
  • 1893. Brymbo Pool is repurposed as a reservoir for the steelworks.
  • 1914. Closure of the Blast Pit, the last deep mine of the Brymbo Colliery.
  • 1930. Closure of Vron Colliery.
  • 1931-33. The steelworks is temporarily closed, but production eventually restarts with the backing of Henry Beyer Robinson.
  • c. 1963. Demolition of Plas Mostyn.
  • 1967. Closure of the last mine in Brymbo, the former Brymbo Co. drift mine at the Smelt.
  • c. 1970. Demolition of Brymbo Hall.
  • 1991. End of steelmaking at Brymbo.